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Writing

Carla is author of over 40 academic articles on appearance and difference appearing in both national and international refereed journals. She is widely cited by critical scholars working in the fields of obesity, eating disorder, and body image disparagement and increasingly, in the field of disability studies and narrative and arts-based methods. Using the knowledge generated through her clinical and research activities, she has co-authored popular and professional resources and her work has been translated into French, Spanish, and Farsi.

Carla’s writing spans several fields with particular interests in debates about eating disorder aetiology; effects of sexual, racial, medical, and colonial trauma on embodiment; gender, race, class, and colonial dimensions of obesity prevention discourses and programs; controversy about “healthy eating” and “healthy weights” messages and BMI surveillance in health and physical education curricula; and the effects of body-based harassment on children and youth. Most recently, she has written on embodied self reflexivity in qualitative research, teaching, and practice; arts-based research methods of digital storytelling and research-based drama; disability arts as “body becoming” pedagogies, or ways of opening possibilities for disabled and fat embodiment through art; and feminist efforts to change limiting, image-driven, idealized conceptions of bodies by creating an more inclusive theory of feminist beauty and sensory pleasure.

Some of these are available for downloading. Others can be ordered from organizations with links below. Her publications centre on six major themes:

    • Envisioning and Re•Visioning Disability and Difference
    • Fat or Fiction: Re•thinking Fat
    • Problems and Possibilities of Embodiment
    • Student Body Diversity and Equity in Schools
    • Gender and Women’s Studies in Canada
    • Embodied Reflexivity in Research and Practice

For a complete listing, download her CV

 

Envisioning and Re•Visioning Disability and Difference

Project Re•Vision (2011-2014). Produced over 90 short films with people with disabilities (artists & non-artists). Themes include perceptions and experiences of bodily differences, sexuality and disability, disability pride and shame, accessibility and inclusion, cultural and medical representations, technologies and health care spaces, interactions with care providers, self-reflectivity, and responses to difference.

Radical Psychology: A Journal of Psychology, Politics and Radicalism, 10th Anniversary Issue of Journal on Bodily Difference The Gender and Bodily Difference issue Fall 2009/Winter 2010 contributes to gendering theoretical conversations on bodily difference by examining the meanings that culture inscribes on bodies and the impact these have for people who embody difference. As part of Radical Psychology’s series on Feminism and Psychology, the issue considers the special significance of gender to analytical concepts and experiences of difference. Contributors include well-known and emerging scholars in the field who draw on feminist phenomenological, poststructuralist, and critical perspectives to highlight issues of obesity and fatness, eating disorders, weight loss and feeding surgeries, disability and physical difference, conjoined twins, and technologies of bodily normalization and transformation, and interrogate how these intersect with gender, sex, and sexual difference conceptually and in people’s embodied everyday experiences. Follow the link to view this special issue: http://radicalpsychology.org/

Rice, C. et al (2014). Project Re•Vision: Storytelling for Social Change. Guelph, ON.

Rice, C. et al (in development). The methodological and pedagogical possibilities of digital storytelling.

Rice, C., Chandler, E., Harrison, E. Ferrari, M., and Liddiard, K. (under review). Project Re•Vision: Disability at the edges of representation. Disability & Society.

Chandler, E. and Rice, C. (authors alphabetical) (2014). Alterity in/of happiness: Reflecting on the radical possibilities of unruly bodies, Health, Culture and Society, 5(1), 230-248.

Rice, C. (2010). Editorial: Gendering bodily difference. Radical Psychology: A Journal of Psychology, Politics and Radicalism, 10th Anniversary Issue on Bodily Difference. Retrieved from: http://radicalpsychology.org/.

Rice, C., Zitzelsberger, H., Porch, W., & Ignagni, E. (2010). Creating community across disability and difference. D. Driedger, (Ed.), Living the Edges: A Disabled Women’s Reader. (pp. 259-272). Toronto: Inanna Publications Inc. (Reprint).

Rice, C., Zitzelsberger, H., Porch, W., & Ignagni, E. (2009). Creating community across disability and difference. T. Titchkovsky & R. Michalko, (Eds.), Disability Studies Reader (pp. 318-329). Toronto: Canadian Scholars’ Press.

Rice, C., Zitszelsberger, H., Porch, W., Ignagni, E., & Erickson, L. (2005). Envisioning new meanings of difference. International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work, 3 & 4, 119-130.

Rice, C., Zitszelsberger, H., Porch, W., & Ignagni, E. (2005). Creating community across disability and difference. Canadian Woman Studies, 24(1), 187-193.

Rice, C., et al (July, 2003). Talking about Body Image, Identity, Disability, and Difference: A Facilitator’s Manual. Toronto: Sunnybrook and Women’s College Health Centre and AboutFace International.

Hitzelsberger, H., Rice, C., et al (September, 2003). Building Bridges across Difference and Disability: A Guide for Health Care Providers Toronto: Sunnybrook and Women’s College Health Centre and AboutFace International.

Zitzelsberger, H., Odette, F., Rice, C., Whittington-Walsh, F., & Aubin, A. (2002). Building bridges across physical difference and disability. In Sharon Abbey (Ed.), Ways Of Knowing in and Through the Body. Weland Ontario: Soleil Publishing.

 

Fat or Fiction: Re-thinking Fat

Rice, C. (in press). Re-thinking fat: From bio- to body becoming pedagogies. Cultural Studies<=>Critical Methodologies (Special Issue on Biopedagogies and/of Public Health)

Rice, C. (submitted, n.d.). Revisioning fat. In W. Mitchinson, J. Ellison, and D. McPhail, (Eds.) Obesity in Canada: Historical and Critical Perspectives. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.

Rice, C. (2010). Becoming the fat girl: Acquisition of an unfit identity. In V. Zawilski (Ed.), Inequality in Canada: A Reader on the Intersections of Gender, Race, and Class (2nd Edition) (pp. 211-230). Don Mills, Ontario: Oxford University Press (Reprint).

Rice, C. (2009). How big girls become fat girls: The cultural production of problem eating and physical inactivity. In H. Malson & M. Burns (Eds.), Critical Feminist Approaches to Eating Dis/Orders (pp. 92 – 109). London and New York: Psychology Press.

Rice, C. (2007). Becoming the fat girl: Emergence of an unfit identity. Women’s Studies International Forum, 30(2), 158-174.

Ciliska, D. & Rice, C. (1994). Body image/Body politics. In E. Dua, M. FitzGerald, L. Gardner, D. Taylor, & L. Wyndels (Eds.), On Women Healthsharing. (pp. 225-233). Toronto: The Women’s Press.

Rice, C. (1993). Freeing future generations: Raising our children without food and weight problems. Nutrition Quarterly, 17(3), 55-71.

Rice, C. (1991). Task force report on obesity treatments needs to focus on weightier issues. Healthsharing 12 (2), 8.

Rice, C. (1990, Fall). Getting cut down to size: How cosmetic and weight loss surgeries are harming women. Hersize Newsletter, 1-4.

Rice, C. (1990, Fall). The unkindest cut of all. The Womanist.

Ciliska, D. & Rice, C. (1989). Body image/Body politics. Healthsharing 10 (3), pp. 13-17.

Rice, C. (1988, June). Flesh of hope and the thinness of despair. Rites Magazine.

Rice, C. (1988, Fall) Mediating fat phobia. Hersize Newsletter, 1-4.

Rice, C. (1988, May). The creation of fat phobia. Mediawatch Bulletin.

Problems and Possibilities of Embodiment

Rice, C. (invited. n.d.). In the mirror of beauty culture. In N. Mandell (Ed.), Feminist Issues: Race, Class and Sexuality (6th Edition). Toronto: Pearson Canada, Inc.

Rice, C. (in development). Puberty as Sexual Spectacle.

LaMarre, A. and Rice, C. (authors alphabetical) with Bear, M. (accepted). Unrecoverable? Prescriptions and possibilities for eating disorder recovery. Nazilla Khanlou and Beryl Pilkington. (Eds.) The Social and Societal Contexts of Women’s Mental Health.

Rice, C. (2013). Exacting beauty: Exploring women’s body projects and problems in the 21st century. In M. Hobbs and C. Rice (Eds.), Gender and Women’s Studies in Canada: Critical Terrain. Toronto: Pearson Canada, Inc. (Reprint)

Rice, C. (2009). Exploring women’s body projects and problems in the 21st century. In N. Mandell (Ed.), Feminist Issues: Race, Class and Sexuality (5th Edition) (pp. 131-160). Toronto: Pearson Canada, Inc.

Rice, C. (2007). Beauty, ability and growing up female. In B. Crow & L. Gottell, (Eds.), Open Boundaries: A Canadian Women’s Studies Reader, Third edition (pp. 320-332). Toronto: Pearson. (Third reprint)

Rice, C. (2006). Nuestros cuerpos, territorios ocupados. In Colectivo Ma Colere, (Eds.) Mi cuerpo es un campo de batalla: Analisis y testimonios. (pp. 93-129). (Reprint of Mon corps est un champ de bataille: Analyses et témoignages by feminist press in Valencia). Valencia, Spain: Ediciones La Burbuja.

Rice, C. (2006). Out from under occupation: Transforming our relationships with our bodies. In A. Medovarski & B. Cranney (Eds.). Canadian Woman Studies: An Introductory Reader, Second edition (pp. 411-424). Toronto: Inanna Publications Inc. (Reprint).

Rice, C. (2006, January). Body image matters.

Rice, C. (2005). Beauty, ability and growing up female. In B. Crow & L. Gottell, (Eds.), Open Boundaries: A Canadian Women’s Studies Reader, Second edition (pp. 320-332). Toronto: Pearson. (Second reprint)

Rice, C. (2004). Mon corps est un champ de bataille. In Ma Colère, (Eds.), Mon corps est un champ de bataille: Analyses et témoignages, (pp. 58-106). Lyon, FR: Éditions ma colère.

Rice, C. (2002). Between body and culture. In V. Dhruvarajan & J. Vickers (Eds.), Gender, Race and Nation: A Global Perspective, (pp. 147-183). Toronto: University of Toronto Press.

Rice, C. (1997). Body image across the life span. Iranian Women Quarterly Journal, 12(2). (Persian Farsi translation of English text).

Rice, C. (June, 1995). Promoting Healthy Body Image: A Guide for Program Planners Toronto. Health Promotion Directorate and the Ontario Prevention Clearinghouse.

Rice, C. (1995). Trauma, eating problems, and the problem of embodiment. Bibliography Series Number 3. OISE, Centre for Women’s Studies in Education, Toronto, 2-54.

Rice, C. (1994). Out from under occupation: Transforming our relationships with our bodies. Canadian Woman Studies, 14(3), 44-51.

Rice, C. (1994). Through another eye: Learning to love our bodies and ourselves. Lesbian Health Guide. Toronto: Queer Press.

Rice, C. (1993). Body image and identity. Organization of Women in Leadership Newsletter.

Rice, C. & Langdon, L. (1993). Women’s struggles with food and weight as survival strategies Canadian Woman Studies, 12(1), 30-34.

Rice, C. & Faulkner, J. (1992). Support and self-help groups. In H. Harper-Guiffre & R. MacKenzie (Eds.), Group Psychotherapy for Eating Disorders. American Psychiatric Press, Washington.

Rice, C. (1991, Fall). Women, food and weight: New perspectives. Women’s Counselling, Referral, and Education Centre (WCREC) Newsletter, 1-4.

Rice, C. (1991). Pandora’s box and cultural paradox: (Hetero)sexuality, lesbianism and bulimia. Resources for Feminist Research, 19(3&4). 54-59.

Rice. C. (1991). A review of “Never Too Thin” by E. Szekely. Resources for Feminist Research, 19 (3&4).

Rice, C. & Langdon, L. (1991). The use and misuse of diagnostic labels. The NEDIC Bulletin, 6(1), 1-4.

Rice. C. (1990). Deconstructing body image: Using memory to understand food and weight issues for women. SEICCAN Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality, 5(3).

Rice, C. (1988). The prevention of eating disorders. The NEDIC Bulletin, 3(4), 1-4.

Rice, C. (1987, December). Society’s obsession with thinness. The NEDIC Bulletin, 1-4.

 

Student Body Diversity and Equity in Schools

inVisibility: Indigenous in the City. (June-July 2013). Produced 20 digital stories with Aboriginal students, teachers, parents, and artists in collaboration with the Aboriginal Education Centre at the Toronto District School Board on decolonizing and indigenizing schools, shown at the John B. Aird Gallery, MacDonald Block, Toronto, ON.

Dion, S. Johnson, K. and Rice, C. (September, 2010). Decolonizing Our Schools: Aboriginal Education in the Toronto District School Board. Toronto: Toronto District School Board.

Larkin, J. & Rice, C. (2006). Harassment and harmful body practices: Broadening the focus of body image education for girls. In F. Leach & C. Mitchell (Eds.) Combating Gender Violence In and Around Schools: International Perspectives (pp. 125-133). Stoke on Trent, UK and Sterling, USA: Trentham Books.

Larkin, J. & Rice, C. (2005). Beyond “Healthy Eating” and “Healthy Weights”: Harassment and the health curriculum in middle schools. Body Image: An International Journal of Research, 2(3), 219-232.

Rice, C. & Russell, V. (2004). Embodying equity: Creating a space for the body in equity education. Orbit. A Publication of the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education 34(1), 19-20.

Rice, C. and Russell, V. (November, 2003). EmBodying Equity: Body Image as an Equity Issue. Toronto: Green Dragon Press.

Larkin, J., Rice, C. & Russell, V. (1999). Sexual harassment and the prevention of eating disorders: Educating young women. In N. Piran, C. Steiner-Adair, & M. Levine (Eds.), Preventing Eating Disorders: A Handbook of Interventions and Special Challenges, (pp. 194-208). New York: Brunner/Mazel.

Rice, C. & Russell, V. (1996). EmBodying Equity: Putting body and soul into equity education, Part I: How oppression is embodied. Our Schools, Ourselves, 7(1), 14-36.

Rice, C. & Russell, V. (1997). From body image to body equity: Teaching at the intersection of equity and health. Orbit: A Publication of the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, 28(1), 21-24.

Rice, C. & Russell, V. (1996). EmBodying Equity: Putting body and soul into equity education, Part II: Strategies for change. Our Schools, Ourselves, 7(2), 42-54.

Larkin, J., Rice, C. & Russell, V. (1996). Slipping through the cracks: Sexual harassment, eating problems and the problem with embodiment. Eating Disorders: A Journal of Prevention and Treatment, 4(2), 5-26.

 

Embodied Reflexivity in Research and Practice

Rice, C. (accepted. n.d.). Volatile bodies and vulnerable researchers: The risks of embodiment research. Sheila Batacharya and Renita Wong. (Eds.) Embodiment, Pedagogy and Decolonization: Critical and Materialist Considerations.

Rice, C. (2013). Imagining the other? Ethical challenges of researching and writing women’s embodied lives. In C. Hughes (Ed.) Researching Gender: Fundamentals of Applied Research. London: Sage. (Reprint)

Rice, C. (2009). Imagining the other? Ethical challenges of researching and writing women’s embodied lives. Feminism & Psychology, 19(2): 245–266.

Rice, C. (2007) Elephant in the Room. Toronto: Centre for Digital Storytelling. A short ethnographical examination of embodied reflexivity in research. Carla shows the film in presentations with academics and health providers to highlight the uses of reflexivity in health research and practice.

 

Gender and Women’s Studies in Canada

Hobbs, M. and Rice, C (authors alphabetical). (2011/12). Reading Women’s and Gender Studies in Canada: A review of recent introductory textbooks. Canadian Woman Studies, 29, (1), 201-208.

Hobbs, M. and Rice, C. (authors alphabetical). (2011). Rethinking Women’s Studies: Curriculum, pedagogy, and the introductory course. Atlantis: A Woman’s Studies Journal/ Revue d’etudes sur les femmes, 35 (2), 139-149.


DR. CARLA RICE
Canada Research Chair, Care, Gender, and Relationships (Tier II)
Associate Professor, Department of Family Relations & Applied Nutrition
College of Social and Applied Human Sciences
University of Guelph
Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1
CONTACT BY PHONE
Guelph office:
1 519-824-4120, ext. 53921

Toronto office:
1 416-779-8930

Fax:
1 (416) 628-1667
CONTACT BY EMAIL
Individuals and organizations interested in body image consulting or speaking can contact Dr. Carla Rice personally at: carlar@uoguelph.ca
SAMPLE VIDEOS
Coming soon.
© Copyright Carla Rice 2016
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